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Carlow

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Re: Carlow

Postby eoinzy » Fri May 22, 2009 10:54 am

ye u say that now. wait til u get into the foundry and start givin it loads!! you'll be lovin it like old times!! :D
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Re: Carlow

Postby kegan5 » Sat May 23, 2009 3:21 am

Lol maybe, we'll see I guess...

I might take a sweeping brush and show EEEEeeeeeuuuuuuuuuuuuugeeeeeeeeeennneee how to sweep :p
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Re: Carlow

Postby eoinzy » Sat May 23, 2009 11:18 am

lol ye i wonder will u see him. doubt there'll be any of the old staff. maybe one or two. last time i was there i didnt recognise anyone bar 1 or 2 of the full timers.
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Re: Carlow

Postby kegan5 » Mon May 25, 2009 11:33 pm

Doubt it, I left in 2005 woop on.

Wonder if my friend in that roadhouse thing will be there? I'm gonna ask her for vegetarian ham soup and a slow cook veggie burger lol
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Re: Carlow

Postby eoinzy » Tue May 26, 2009 1:40 pm

lol

i met someone that new her. said she was a reject!!
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Re: Carlow

Postby marksmith » Sun Mar 06, 2011 10:41 pm

The Carlow area has been settled for thousands of years, evidence of human occupation extends back thousands of years, the most notable and dramatic prehistoric site being the Browneshill Dolmen just outside of Carlow town.

Now part of the diocese of Kildare and Leighlin, several early Christian settlements are still in evidence today around the county. St Mullin's monastery is believed to have been established around the 7th century, the ruins of which are still in evidence today. Old Leighlin was the site of one of the largest monastic settlements in Ireland and the location for a church synod in 630 AD which determined the date of Easter. St Comhgall built a monastery in the Carlow area in the 6th century, an old church building and burial ground survive today at Castle Hill known as Mary's Abbey. Carlow was an Irish stronghold for agriculture in the early 800s which earned the county the nickname of the scallion eaters. The famines wiped out a lot of the population, cutting it in half.

Carlow Castle was constructed by William Marshal, Earl of Striguil and Lord of Leinster, c1207-13, to guard the vital river crossing. It was also to serve as the capital of Ireland, or more precisely the Lordship of Ireland under King Richard II from 1361 until 1374. This imposing structure survived largely intact until 1814 when it was mostly destroyed in an attempt to turn the building into a lunatic asylum. The present remains now are the West Wall with two of its cylindrical towers. The bridge over the river Barrow - Graiguecullen Bridge, is agreed to date to 1569. The original structure was largely replaced and widened in 1815 when it was named Wellington Bridge in celebration of the defeat of Napoleon's army by the Duke of Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo in June of that year. The bridge was built across a small island in the river and a 19th century house was constructed on the bridge - this was for a time occupied by the Poor Clares, an enclosed religious order who still have a convent in Graiguecullen. Carlow Cathedral, designed by Thomas Cobden, was the first Catholic cathedral to be to be built in Ireland after Catholic Emancipation in 1829, construction of the cathedral cost £9,000 and was completed in 1833. Beside the cathedral, Saint Patrick's College dates from 1793. The College, was established in 1782 to teach the humanities to both lay students and those studying for the priesthood. The Carlow Courthouse was constructed in the 19th century. There are still many old estates and houses in the surrounding areas, among them Ducketts Grove and Dunlecky Manor. St Mullin's today houses a heritage centre.

In 1703 the Irish House of Commons appointed a committee to bring in a bill to make the Barrow navigable, by 1800 the Barrow Track was completed between St. Mullin's and Athy, establishing a link to the Grand Canal which runs between Dublin and the Shannon. By 1845 88,000 tons of goods were being transported on the Barrow Navigation. Carlow was also one of the earliest towns to be connected by train, the Great Southern and Western Railway had opened its mainline as far as Carlow in 1846, this was extended further to reach Cork in 1849. The chief engineer, William Dargan, originally hailed from Killeshin, just outside of Carlow. At the peak of railway transport Ireland, Carlow county was also served by a railway line to Tullow. Public supply of electricity in Carlow was first provided from Milford Mill, approximately 8 km south of Carlow, in 1891. Milford Mill still generates electricity feeding into the national grid. Following independence in the early 1920s the new government of the Irish Free State decided to establish a sugar-processing plant in Leinster, Carlow was settled on as the location due to its transport links and large agricultural hinterland, favourable for growing sugar beet.

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